Friday, May 3, 2013

The Evolution of the Mystry Genre


The Name of the Rose


                                                  by

                                           Umberto Eco

The Name of the Rose is a historical murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327, an intellectual mystery combining semiotics in fiction, biblical analysis, medieval studies and literary theory. First published in Italian in 1980 under the title Il nome della rosa, it appeared in English in 1983.

William of Baskerville and his novice Adso of Melk travel to a Benedictine monastery in Northern Italy to attend a theological disputation. As they arrive, the monastery is disturbed by a suicide. As the story unfolds, several other monks die under mysterious circumstances. William is tasked by the abbot of the monastery to investigate the deaths as fresh clues with each murder victim lead William to dead ends and new clues. The protagonists explore a labyrinthine medieval library, discuss the subversive power of laughter, and come face to face with the Inquisition. William's innate curiosity and highly-developed powers of logic and deduction provide the keys to unravelling the mysteries of the abbey. It was listed #23 on the Mystery Writer’s of America’s Top 100 Mystery Novels of all Time.


Umberto Eco (January 5, 1932)

Umberto Eco is an Italian semiotician, essayist, philosopher, literary critic, and novelist. He is best known for his groundbreaking 1980 novel Il nome della rosa (The Name of the Rose) He has since written further novels, including Il pendolo di Foucault (Foucault's Pendulum) and L'isola del giorno prima (The Island of the Day Before). His most recent novel Il cimitero di Praga (The Prague Cemetery), released in 2010, was a best-seller.


Eco has also written academic texts, children's books and many essays. He is founder of the Dipartimento di Comunicazione at the University of the Republic of San Marino, President of the Scuola Superiore di Studi Umanistici, University of Bologna, member of the Accademia dei Lincei (since November 2010) and an Honorary Fellow of Kellogg College, University of Oxford.

4 comments:

  1. If the book is anything like the movie--(which I've not had the pleasure of reading) I certainly will do so! I have the DVD starring Sean Connery as William of Baskerville; how can you go wrong? :)

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    1. I haven't seen the movie, but I did enjoy the book. I'll have to see if I can find the movie.

      V

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  2. If the book is anything like the movie--(which I've not had the pleasure of reading) I certainly will do so! I have the DVD starring Sean Connery as William of Baskerville; how can you go wrong? :)

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  3. I read the book years and years ago. Well not that long ago as I'm only 39. LOL

    A very, very good read.

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